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Saturday, June 9
 

1:15pm

An Ongoing Treasure Hunt - One library's practical experiences documenting post-cancellation perpetual access
Experiences realized by Albertsons Library staff in documenting post-cancellation perpetual access offers practical solutions for implementing a 'controlled approach' to recordkeeping and workflow which focuses on the 'longer run' large purchase deals and packages.  While undoubtedly some perpetual access e-journal content may well 'slip through the cracks', on-going access to highly used and/or expensive purchases would be chronicled.

In a 2014 article entitled "Providing Perpetual Access: Results of a Survey", author Sarah Glasser identified 'four top challenges' encountered in efforts to provide post-cancellation perpetual access for e-journal content.  These included the "extensive work involved, documentation shortfalls, dealing with transferred titles, and license issues".  (Glasser 2014, p.150)

Albertsons Library embarked on a practical effort this past year to document post-cancellation perpetual access for those ejournal titles that had been or were part of large package purchases.  It was felt there would be more success to work with vendors and publishers from whom we had purchased content over long periods of time.  Documenting content to which we were entitled was challenging, and hampered by limits to accounting records maintained at the Library and University; a change in the Library's ILS system; limited or incomplete access to 3rd party subscription agent order and payment records; and changes or the demise of consortia.  Decisions were made to 'work with the known' more recent electronic journal content purchased, and to work backwards from there, using the interest and talents of a graduate MLIS student employed elsewhere in Library.  A procedure for creating standardized notation of perpetual access scope by title was devised for use in the ILS cataloging module as well as the Library's ERMS system.

This proposed program at the NASIG conference in Atlanta in June 2018 would provide an opportunity to offer examples of practical workflows and procedures pertaining to documentation of perpetual access while sharing insight into the 'pitfalls' and 'dead-ends' encountered for finding the needed information to claim ongoing access to these electronic resources.

Speakers
avatar for Arthur Aguilera

Arthur Aguilera

Boise State University, Albertsons Library
avatar for Nancy Sims Donahoo

Nancy Sims Donahoo

Serials Manager, Boise State University, Albertsons Library


Saturday June 9, 2018 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Highland Ballroom III

1:15pm

Cultivating TALint: Using the Core Competencies as a framework for training future information professionals
In 2014, the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Information and the University of Toronto Libraries (UTL) partnered in the development of the TALint (Toronto Academic Libraries Internship) program.  Focused on workplace-integrated-learning (W-I-L), the TALint program provides enhanced educational experiences for Masters of Information students by combining periods of in-class study with actual workplace experiences. The two-year program is intended to enhance the quality of student learning by providing interns with specialized knowledge and practical skills, professional development and mentorship opportunities. It is often the case that the workplace is ahead of academic programs. This is particularly true in technical services and the field of electronic resource management, where the requisite knowledge and practical skills required to perform these roles has traditionally been under-represented within library and information studies curricula. The TALint program has provided UTL with the unique opportunity to bridge the gap between the expertise developed through information studies programs and the specific knowledge and skills required to take on roles as electronic resource librarians.  With this year’s TALint cohort in UTL’s Metadata Technologies Team, we are using NASIG’s Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians as a framework for training our two TALint interns.  In this session, presenters will discuss the development of a comprehensive student training plan in electronic resource management, the ongoing assessment of learning outcomes, student perceptions of competency-based training, and the benefits of using the Core Competencies that have been felt beyond the internship program. We will share how this training plan can better equip Masters of Information students for careers in electronic resource management by producing graduates who are qualified, technologically skilled and workplace-ready.

Speakers
avatar for Marlene van Ballegooie

Marlene van Ballegooie

Metadata Technologies Manager, University of Toronto
Marlene van Ballegooie is the Metadata Technologies Manager at the University of Toronto Libraries. She received her MISt degree from the Faculty of Information Studies, University of Toronto. At the University of Toronto Libraries, Marlene is responsible for managing the Metadata... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Browning

Jennifer Browning

Metadata Librarian, Carleton University
Jennifer received her MLIS from Western University in London, Ontario. Her research and work interests include metadata and user communities, authority control within linked data contexts, ERM workflows, and mentorship and workplace integrated learning for students.


Saturday June 9, 2018 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Grand Ballroom II/III

2:30pm

Wrangle and Corral that License Agreement
By now, you’ve probably attended several sessions to learn and understand what should and shouldn’t be in an electronic resource license agreement. It can be a daunting task to keep track of everything – what items does your university/state require in the license agreement, what can’t be in license agreement, and where exactly are you in that process? Is it under review? Sent for signature? With the General Counsel’s Office? Waiting on the vendor? The possibilities are endless. And, once you’ve got everything squared away, the job isn’t done. Is it in the ERM? Is it filed (either print or electronic or both)?

As anyone who’s worked with License agreements knows, the process of managing the workflow for a license agreement is almost as daunting as reviewing the license agreement. In this session, two librarians will present how they manage the licensing workflow from start to finish.

Alexis Linoski will share how she uses Trello to manage the license workflow from receipt to entry in the ERM. Checklists will be shared as will criteria for choosing what data from each license agreement is entered in the ERM. While the workflow will vary from institution to institution, and in some cases will vary depending on the type of license (i.e. locally negotiated agreement vs a consortial agreement), this process can be modified to meet any workflow need and accommodate collaboration and process management with team members. In addition, it will include a high level overview of some of the features of Trello.

Carolyn Carpan will share the how the Collection Strategies Unit at the University of Alberta Libraries inherited two licensing databases, one of which displays usage rights to users and how they merged the two database, using CORAL for their combined product. She will discuss why libraries would build a licensing database and display usage rights for licensed materials to users, how to use the CORAL licensing database for this purpose, discuss advantages and limitations of the CORAL licensing database over other products, and make recommendations for enhancements to the CORAL licensing module.

Speakers
avatar for Carolyn Carpan

Carolyn Carpan

Collection Strategies Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries
AL

Alexis Linoski

Licensed Content Coordinator, Georgia Institute of Technology


Saturday June 9, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Grand Ballroom II/III
 
Sunday, June 10
 

10:45am

Core Competencies at Every Stage
The Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians (CCERL) has defined the role of an electronic resources librarian (ERL) and has served as a framework for additional applications.  The (CCERL) has helped ERLs reorganize departments, create updated job descriptions, and implement Library Services Platforms. Librarians have also used the (CCERL) to extend skills to digital projects, weeding projects, scholarly communications and other areas.  This presentation seeks to further connect theory to practical applications by illustrating how the (CCERL) impacted three librarians at the beginning, middle, and later stages of their careers. A new librarian will describe how competencies guided training during the first year as an ERL.  A recently promoted librarian will demonstrate how the competencies were used to organize a promotion dossier. Finally, an experienced librarian will provide insight on how the development of the (CCERL) has shaped the field of electronic resources librarianship.

Speakers
avatar for Eleanor I. Cook

Eleanor I. Cook

Assistant Director for Discovery & Technology Services, East Carolina University
Eleanor I. Cook has worked in the library field for over 30 years, and is currently Assistant Director for Discovery and Technology Services at Joyner Library at East Carolina University. She has had various technical services responsibilities including both monographic and serials/e-resources... Read More →
avatar for Angela Dresselhaus

Angela Dresselhaus

Head of Electronic Resources, Eastern Carolina University
avatar for Rebecca Tatterson

Rebecca Tatterson

East Carolina University
Electronic Resources Librarian, East Carolina University


Sunday June 10, 2018 10:45am - 11:45am
Highland Ballroom I/II

10:45am

From Content Creation to Content Delivery: Partnering to improve e-book accessibility
Part I. We will discuss how publishers, aggregators, and libraries can partner to provide a better experience for users.  We will discuss the consolidated results of a number of studies and audits of eBook accessibility, limitations and options for creating accessible PDF and EPUB eBook files, the real-life impact of these limitations on users, and what skillsets we can help to develop and disseminate to help close the gap.

Part II. We will discuss the methods to assess accessibility of your eBooks, website or other electronic resources.  We will look at both automated testing systems and usability testing.  After this session we hope you will have an understanding of how these two approaches can be leveraged to help optimize the research experience for your users.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Fulkerson

Melissa Fulkerson

Director, Institutional Aggregator Sales, Elsevier
Melissa Fulkerson has responsibility for ebook sales and distribution of Elsevier's Books portfolio through resellers and aggregators. Her focus is on ensuring platform choice for libraries and flexibility in business models while driving a sustainable future for ebooks with researchers... Read More →
avatar for JaEun Ku(Jemma)

JaEun Ku(Jemma)

Internet Applications Systems Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Dr. Ku had started her career as an academic librarian who was responsible for collection development, user instruction, monographs and serials cataloging. Her professional career has transitioned to an accessible user experience designer and web application developer over the years... Read More →
avatar for Jill Power

Jill Power

Product Manager, EBSCO Information Services
avatar for Emma Waecker

Emma Waecker

Senior Product Manager for eBooks, EBSCO Information Services
Emma has been at EBSCO Information Services for 9 years, and is currently Senior Product Manager for EBSCO eBooks. She is passionate about all things user experience, and has recently been focused on advancing the accessibility and mobile responsiveness of the EBSCO eBooks experience... Read More →


Sunday June 10, 2018 10:45am - 11:45am
Library